Jasion EB7 Foldable Electric Bike

4.3

Features

4.0/5

Design

4.0/5

Performance

4.5/5

Ease of Use

4.5/5

Value

4.5/5

Pros

  • Strong 500W acceleration and smooth 7-gear ride
  • Detachable, long-range 480Wh battery
  • Foldable and accommodates shorter riders
  • Electronic horn, headlight with large color LCD, USB port
  • Excellent stability with fat tires

Cons

  • Location of ignition
  • Throttle disabled when PAS is 0 (Off)
  • Not for advanced mountain biking
  • Quite heavy at 59 lbs
  • No replacement keys available
Read: 20 mins.
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Comfortable And Space-Saving

My parents recently retired after decades of working 14+ hour shifts at their donut shop every… single… day of the year. It was time for them to enjoy their lives and to further bond with the grandchildren they love. First, my brothers and I gave our dad the Metakoo Cybertrack 100 to help him go up the hills and bike longer distances, and next, we had been on the lookout for a comfortable bicycle just tall enough for our 5’1″ mom. You would not believe how difficult that search had been because there were several criteria I wanted for her:

EB7 Foldable eBike /Jasion

EB7 Foldable eBike /Jasion

  • Decent motor to aid with steep inclines
  • 7 or 21 speeds/gears for tackling difficult, uphill climbs
  • Pedal Assist System (PAS)
  • Easy to get on/off for a woman in her 60s
  • Comfortable ride with shock suspension
  • Fat tires for more balance and control
  • Detachable, large battery for long rides and convenient charging

Several bikes I had tested were made for riders who were at least 5’3″ tall, had lousy battery life, or had small diameter wheels that would make rides less comfortable for an older woman. The Jasion EB7 Foldable Electric Bike checked every box I was looking for, EXCEPT: it was listed for 5’2″ riders. Would the extra inch be a problem for my 5’1″ mom? Only one way to find out by test-driving it.

Why An eBike?

Electric bicycles have enabled our family to travel longer distances and visit more places even though many riders still shun them. They feel that motor assistance is cheating and I agree! Biking is as much a sport as it is recreational: on one hand, there are those who want to challenge their physical abilities, and on the other, it is a more leisure way to explore and bond with family and friends. Two children have steered the competitive me towards the latter as seeing the joy on their faces has even trumped the thrill I used to seek on the mountain trails. Towing them in our Burley D’Lite 2-Seat Trailer (with 45-100 lbs extra) was no joke: cramping up during a trip made for a PAINFUL ride home! That was when I really started to appreciate electric bikes — the motorized assistance on the uphill climbs and during the final return miles with tired legs had been a welcome blessing!

Googo SY26 with Burley D'Lite (25 mi)

Googo SY26 with Burley D’Lite (25 mi)

Bike or Scooter?

Electric scooters are more nimble to move around with — and in some cases, more fun — but local laws may prevent them from going onto the same paths as electric bicycles. Most can also be carried around more easily due to their more compact size and lighter weight. Personally, I prefer bikes because they are safer to operate, can (usually) go onto the same places that mechanical bicycles can operate, are (generally) allowed to carry an additional passenger, and if the battery runs out or fails, you can still pedal around. A scooter would stop to function without a battery.

In A Nutshell

Jasion’s 20″ Foldable Electric Bike (EB7) immediately hit me with its quality build. Despite the shipping box that could use more heavier-duty cardboard, the content arrived undamaged with good foam padding at the right places. The bike’s 59 lbs made it one of the heavier electric bicycles I had tested, but there was a reason for that: larger battery and stronger motor.

Assembly was straight-forward, although the instruction manual gave me a bit of a scare as its steps detailed putting together the individual components of the headset, front fork, and front brakes. “Holy moly!” I thought to myself, giving flashbacks on when I had to frustratingly try to figure out how to put together the individual, small pieces of a mechanical mountain bike a year ago for the first time. Thankfully, the stem, fork, and brakes were already pre-assembled, and all I had to do was mount the handlebar, attach the front wheel and headlight to the fork, add the seat and pedals, and off we went. I was pleasantly surprised that the front disc brakes were not rubbing and required no adjustment, but I am certain that your experience probably would vary since nearly EVERY bike I had put together needed some tweaking.

Folded

Folded

Ride performance was clean, smooth, and comfortable thanks to its fat tires and front AND rear suspension to smooth out bumps and rocky terrain. Shock absorption level could be adjusted for the front fork for increased pedaling efficiency. Fat tires (with low tire pressure) perform better on snow and sand than road or mountain ones by not sinking as much. Furthermore, the motor’s 500W of (nominal) power was strong, holding a 43% advantage over both my Googo SY26 and dad’s Metakoo Cybertrack 100 mountain eBikes. That meant a very sudden, rapid speed increase that could feel out of control at times, but my mom handled it like a champ after a few minutes of riding. Yes, despite her being 5’1″ tall and the manufacturer claiming a design for persons of at least 5’2″ height, she comfortably mounted and dismounted without a single complaint. I test-rode it myself and wow, it definitely accelerated much faster than my Googo, and so I was confident it could handle hills better than mine — and it did indeed!

Fat tires, when deflated to a low pressure, perform better on snow and sand than road or mountain ones because they do not sink as much.

The Jasion had a very clean, streamlined look with cables tucked away nicely. A diagonal frame just under the seat and on top of the down tube provided an extra handle to carry the bike around with, though as I had stated, its 59 lbs would not be something my elderly mom would be happy to carry around. It took a bit of a struggle to unlock the stem and down tube, and it also was not easy (for my mother) to fold the frame in half, but with a bit of adjustment, it became more effortless without affecting the integrity and safety mechanism. You could certainly leave the bike as it was shipped since that would make it safer to operate.

Shifting between the 7 gears was effortless with a thumb and finger control mechanism, and the fat tires gave a very satisfying sound while zipping around the neighborhood park and up a few climbs. Power Assist (PAS) was available in 5 levels by default, and speed topped at a FAST 24.1 mph (38.8 km/h) without a rider. Legally, electric bikes cannot go faster than 20 mph to fall under the United States Class 2 designation, and in California, only Class 2 can ride on Class 1 bike paths. What does that mean? This bicycle’s motor was too fast to legally operate in California, but thankfully, the speed did drop to 20 mph with either my mom or myself riding on it. Either way, be sure to check with your local and State laws before you push the Jasion to its top speed.

Control & Gear Shifter

Control & Gear Shifter

Electronic controls found on the left side of the handlebar were easy to use and managed the headlight, horn, PAS level, power, and color display. The screen was easily readable under direct sunlight and provided a nice set of information, including battery and Power Assist levels, speed (current, average, max) in mph or km/h, trip time and odometer, and more. Programming options were available on the screen to control various settings — See PROGRAMMING section for more details. A covered USB port underneath the LCD allowed a mobile device to be charged, such as a phone used for map navigation.

The large, 480Wh-capacity, Li-Ion battery (10Ah @ 48V) gave the Jasion a significant advantage over any of the bikes I had previously tested, including my Googo’s 360Wh. Longer runtimes with a more powerful motor, although also with more weight: 25-45 miles on fully-electric and 40-55 miles with pedal assist (the manufacturer did claim more conservative numbers of 20-25 and 25-40 miles, respectively.) My past experience found that it should theoretically be able to handle at least 130 miles with PAS only used for short uphill climbs. I prefer pedaling most of the time for exercise/health purposes and only invoke the motor just enough to get up a hill. This can be done by twisting the throttle found on the right side of the handlebar: the more you turn it, the more power is invoked on-demand. That leads me to some of the things I did not like about this bicycle.

Jasion EB7 Foldable eBike

Jasion EB7 Foldable eBike

Unlike the Metakoo Cybertrack 100, every bike I had tested could not activate the throttle while PAS was turned off or set to level 0, the Jasion included. This perhaps is a safety feature to prevent accidental acceleration when power assist was disabled, but I really enjoyed Metakoo’s implementation because it allowed me to pedal unassisted at all times and ONLY power on the motor when I turned the throttle. The Jasion (and all other bikes) required changing the PAS to level 1 before the throttle could temporarily be activated. One would then have to change PAS back to 0 for non-motorized operation. It is a very minor gripe that I got over very easily with my Googo, and it perhaps is best for the rider’s safety to NOT allow on-demand assist with PAS off.

Ignition: Key Positions

Ignition: Key Positions

Two keys were included and required to operate the bike’s battery. So, do NOT lose them! The “ignition” could very annoyingly be found below the down tube over which some cabling ran, and the bicycle could not power on without leaving the key inside. That made me a bit upset even though the lock also served to secure the battery. If the key needed to be left in the ignition, then moving it to the handlebar or another accessible location instead would have made for easy insertion/removal (like the Evercross H5 eScooter). Having it at the bottom required one to crouch to align the key with the insertion hole, and if the key was in the incorrect locking position, it could potentially fall off and leave you scrambling to find it. I attached a velcro to it and the cable to prevent that from happening. Most riders would likely just decide to leave the key in at all times.

Warning: Do NOT lose the keys. You cannot operate the bike’s battery without one!

The battery was housed within the down tube and removing it was inconvenient: first, turn the key to the unlock position, then fold the frame in half to allow the battery to slide out. On the flip side, this mechanism kept the battery safely protected within the tube and also helped to keep the bike compact.

Front wheel skewer unfortunately was not the quick-release type. This made it harder to steal the tire, but also less convenient to fix flats without bringing a wrench to undo the bolts. One should note that the manual mentioned safety locks were included, but our Jasion had not. Customer service said that a pair would be mailed out.

Motor, Number by Crank, Fat Tire

Motor, Number by Crank, Fat Tire

The serial number was etched onto the bottom front of the stem, but curiously, I also found a different number on the frame by the left crank. This may lead to confusion for law enforcement trying to match the registered serial number in the event of a recovery.

Jasion included a 109W AC brick to charge the battery with in about 4-5 hours. The battery could be left charging within the down tube or removed for energizing by your desk.

Despite the shortcomings I had mentioned — particularly the frustration of needing to leave the key inside the ignition underneath the down tube — this electric bicycle made my mom very happy. It was a joy to spin for both her and me, and the build quality and riding comfort were top-notch. For me, personally, the 500W motor provided for a very smooth acceleration, but keep in mind that it could scare a beginner rider for the first time when that initial power kicks in. I felt solidly in control and the suspension worked well in conjunction with the fat tires to even out the effects caused by rocky or shaky terrains. If Jasion could figure out how to move the ignition to the handlebar, I would have been an even happier rider, but then again, my mom does not mind at all. Solid, foldable bicycle.

Jasion EB7 Foldable Electric Bike Test (With 5′ 1″ Rider)

What’s Good? What’s Bad?

Pros

  • Strong, smooth acceleration with brushless motor
    • Nominal (average) power: 500W. Rated (maximum) power: Unknown (700W?)
      • Googo: 350W (560W peak) / Metakoo: 350W (500W peak) / Ancheer: 500W (700W peak)
      • 500W may give beginner riders an initial scare the first time the motor kicks in with a very sudden, rapid speed increase
    • Top speed: 24.1 mph, tested without rider / 20.2 mph with rider. California speed limit: 20 mph
  • (4) Power modes
    • Fully electric: No pedaling necessary
    • PAS – Pedal Assist System: Get assistance while pedaling
    • Motor off: Move bike with the power of your own legs ;-)
    • On demand: Turn handlebar throttle to manually increase speed and motor assist level
ZBL Battery removed from frame

ZBL Battery removed from frame

  • Battery: 480Wh Li-Ion (48V @ 10Ah) (Model: ZBL-48V10Ah XC, “SN: A633”)
    • Detachable with Lock and one of 2 keys for more convenient, off-bike charging
    • Only used about 20% on a 25-mile trip
      • Motor was only activated to assist with uphill climbs, and the rest of the time was pedaled manually
    • Housed within the down tube and accessible by folding the bike in half
    • These types of batteries have a 500+ cycle lifespan and lose about 20-25% capacity after every 500 cycle
    • Automatic power off (5 mins idle by default)

Warning: Two keys are included — do NOT lose them! Bike cannot be powered on without one, and they also lock the battery to prevent its theft.

Dimensions /Jasion

Dimensions /Jasion

  • Range: 20-25 mi on fully-electric, 25-40 mi on pedal assist modes (according to manufacturer)
    • Our own tests found the range to be more like 25-45 mi on fully-electric, 40-55 mi on pedal assist modes
    • Approx. 130 mi with occasional pedal assist based on our 25 mi ride with motorized help only on uphill climbs
  • 109W wall charger (2A @ 54.6V)
    • Manufacturer claimed empty to 100% in 4-5 hours. My tests agreed
  • IPX4 water resistance – “Resistant to water splashes from any direction”
    • Bikeable in rain but do NOT go through water that is high enough to reach the motor or battery!
  • Shimano 7 speeds
    • When the battery is out, the higher number of gears will allow easier, more effective, manual pedaling
  • Dual, mechanical disc brakes for faster, more controlled stopping
  • Front AND rear shock suspension for smoother, comfortable handling
    • Front level is adjustable for increased pedal efficiency at the expense of comfort
  • Large, color LCD Control Panel
    • Displays speed (mph by default) (current, average, max) / battery level / motor assistance amount (PAS 0-5) / odometer / trip distance and time / and more
      • When motor assistance level is set to 0, motor does not turn on, and you will pedal fully manual
    • Covered USB port underneath the display for charging devices (0.5A/ 5V)
    • Backlit with 5 intensity options and readable in bright daylight
    • Some programmable settings. See Programming section

Serial number is etched into the lower, front part of the stem tube for registration with local police to aid with recovery. However, there is a different number also found on the frame by the left crank. This may lead to confusion for law enforcement to match the registered serial number.

  • Arrived nearly fully assembled
    • Should take 15-20 mins to finish build, but took me significantly longer due to taking photos and making modifications with third-party additions and parts
      • Attach handlebar, pedals, front wheel, seat post, headlight, and make small, tuning adjustments to the front brake as needed
      • Surprisingly, the front disc brake needed no adjustment (this rarely happened with any bike I had previously built)
      • Manual detailed steps that had you build the headset, front fork, and front brakes from scratch, but luckily that was not the case with my unit. They already came pre-assembled (as it should!)
  • Electronic headlight and horn
Front and Rear Suspension

Front and Rear Suspension

  • Foldable, aluminum alloy frame with rider support for up to 300 lbs
    • Excellent built quality and compact
      • Folded: 38″ L x 23″ H x 28″ W / Unfolded: 67″ L x 42″ H x 23.6″ W
    • Can accommodate 5’2″ – 6’2″ biker height with its quick-release seat post, though my mom at 5’1″ was (barely) still able to ride
      • Seat height: 26.3″ – 38.5″
    • Adjustable handlebar height: 42″ – 47″
    • Diagonal frame just under the seat and on top of the down tube serves as an extra handle to carry bike around with
Ignition, Frame Folding Mechanism

Ignition, Frame Folding Mechanism

  • Streamlined cabling along the bottom of the down tube
  • 20″ Fat Tires (20 x 3.0 tube) for more controlled, comfortable rides
    • When deflated to a low pressure, fat tires perform better on snow and sand than road or mountain ones by not sinking as much
    • Uses Schrader valve with recommended pressure of 35 psi (max)

Tip: Fat tires, when deflated to a low pressure, perform better on snow and sand than road or mountain ones because they do not sink as much.

  • Weight: 59 lbs. Heavier than our previously-tested Googo/Metakoo/Ancheer and a non-electric Santa Cruz Heckler
    • Extra weight due to a larger battery and stronger motor
  • Built-in kickstand
  • Rear skewer long enough for mounting Burley trailer hitch
  • Illustrated installation manual included
  • Tools included
  • 2 year warranty (jasionride.com)

Cons

  • Ignition is at bottom of the down tube
    • Very inconvenient to insert key to power the bike on or to lock/unlock battery because it requires you to crouch down considerably
      • Cabling running across it adds to the frustration
    • Key is required to stay inserted to power bike on. It also serves to lock the battery against theft
      • May accidentally lose the key during a ride if switched to the wrong position
      • Key could get damaged if down tube hits a hard object. It could also get dirty from mud
      • Key may not be replaceable
    • This is the BIGGEST complaint I have with this bike. I wish it was relocated to the handlebar or another, more easily accessible place
Ignition, Frame Folding Mechanism

Ignition, Frame Folding Mechanism

  • No on-demand pedal assist while PAS is off (set to level 0). Minor gripe but would have been a nice-to-have
    • Googo and Ancheer were the same way. Only Metakoo’s Cybertrack 100 had the option to temporarily kick on the motor by turning the handlebar throttle
  • Battery takes some effort to remove because it requires you to first fold the bike
    • Could not find where to purchase an extra battery, not even on manufacturer’s website at jasionride.com
  • Front wheel skewer is not quick-release
    • Cons: More inconvenient to fix flat tire, especially if a wrench was not brought for the bolts. Takes more time to attach/detach wheel
    • Pro: Slightly better theft deterrent. Casual thieves do not like to spend more time than necessary
Front Wheel, Headlight

Front Wheel, Headlight

  • LCD screen may get damaged from a fall
  • Electric Horn and Headlight do not work without turning on the LCD
  • No electronic Taillight
    • Included, battery-operated tail light outputs in red, blue, or alternating. Color combination is illegal in California and possibly the USA because of its association with the police
  • No fast-charging of battery
    • Metakoo included a 168W wall charger (4A @ 42V) that allowed its battery to go from empty to 100% in as little as 3 hours. Jasion’s 109W charger took 4-5 hours
  • Some may prefer a thumb throttle instead of the handlebar throttle
  • Keys to lock/unlock battery were not numbered
    • May not be possible to get a matching replacement. So, do NOT lose them!

Warning: Do NOT lose the keys! Battery does not work without one!

Handlebar folded down

Handlebar folded down

  • Shipping box could use more heavy-duty cardboard, though content arrived undamaged with good foam padding
  • Some assembly required
    • Those not well-versed with bike building may struggle a bit, especially if some tuning needs to be performed. I was able to obtain a video from Jasion customer service and posted it on YouTube with their permission
  • Illustrated manual was good and also easy to follow along for the more experienced installer
  • Not built for advanced mountain biking
  • Heavy at 59 lbs due in part to a larger battery

Tips

Maintenance

  • Before first use, charge the battery fully
    • Covered charging port is on the removable battery itself
    • AC charging brick LED: Red = Charging. Green = Full
    • Lithium Ion batteries are known to be volatile and could catch on fire
      • Do not charge overnight or unsupervised for prolonged periods of time. Stop charging once full
      • Do not leave the bike in full sun or below freezing
    • Keep battery charged at 50% or more to prolong battery’s 500+ cycle lifespan. Try to never let it drain completely
      • Lithium-Ion batteries lose about 20-25% of capacity after every 500 charging cycle
  • Before riding, check the tire pressure (35 psi max) and tighten any loose screws
    • Ensure seat post is locked and tight
AC Wall Charger and ZBL Battery

AC Wall Charger and ZBL Battery

Operations

  • Motor: Switch battery on and turn on display by long-pressing the Power button on the controller
    • Set Pedal Assist to level 1 or higher by pressing “+” button. Motor kicks in as you pedal
    • Throttle the handlebar accelerator by the right-side handle, and the motor will fully take over (Power on demand)
      • The more you turn, the faster the bike will go
    • To power off the motor so you would only be able to pedal manually, press Power button (Pedal only), set PAS to level 0 on the display, or turn off the battery
  • Headlight: Press the Light button. Display does not need to be turned on
  • Electronic Horn: Press the Horn button. Display does not need to be turned on
Control & Gear Shifter

Control & Gear Shifter

  • Data display: “M” button toggles Odometer, Trip mileage, Trip time, etc.
  • Display backlight: Turns on when Power is on. Long-press “+” button to decrease/restore brightness level
  • Walking power assist: Press and hold “-” button for 2 secs to activate motor at low speed
    • Helps with walking the bike uphill at 3.7 mph (6 km/h)
    • When in motion, this activates low-speed cruise control
  • USB port: Long-press “M” button to toggle on/off
  • Odometer: Toggle with Power button (Time, Odometer, Power, Trip)
  • Clear data: Long-press “+” and “-” buttons at the same time to clear max/avg speed, trip, and time
  • As battery neared empty, I noticed that maximum speed gradually lowered
  • Do not brake hard. Doing so could make you painfully tumble, skid, and/or wear out the tires
    • Be aware of unexpected obstacles. I tumbled once while mountain biking and was hurt quite badly. It was not fun

Aircraft Transport

Most, if not all, airlines prohibit electronic scooters and bikes that do not meet specific criteria. United Airlines, for example, allows collapsible ones whose battery is both removable and below 300 Wh. Southwest Airlines is more restrictive at 160 Wh. This bike’s battery is 480 Wh. Lithium-ion batteries are known to be volatile, and the higher their capacity, the more risky they are. Check with the airlines, TSA, and FAA for more details.

Bike Assembly

Here are some installation tips for those assembling their first bicycle. First, look at the below diagram to identify the major bike parts, then watch the Jasion-made YouTube video found right after.

Bike Repair Stands

I use a repair stand to help with assembly and maintenance. SereneLife SLBKRS3 has a maximum load capacity of 66.7 lbs — enough to carry most electric bikes without falling over.

SereneLife Bike Repair Stand, Metakoo Cybertrack 100 mountain eBike

SereneLife Bike Repair Stand, Metakoo Cybertrack 100 mountain eBike

For easier maintenance or assembly, a bike repair stand can save a lot of time and back pain. Be sure to get one that can hold up your bicycle’s weight.

Bike Parts

Bicycle Parts /Al2 (CC by 3.0, Wikimedia CurID 2995998)

Bicycle Parts /Al2 (CC by 3.0, Wikimedia CurID 2995998)

Installation Video

20″ EB7 Electric Bike Unboxing & Assembly /Jasion

Step-By-Step

Some third-party parts were replaced or added while I assembled the bike. I will point out which ones were not included by Jasion.

If you already know how to assemble a bike, please skip to the next section.

Have included tools ready. Remove all protective material.

Securely clamp the handlebar. The handlebar should be secured to the stem with 4 bolts in alternating, opposite order. It is very important the bolts are securely tightened to prevent handles from coming loose while riding.

Mount front wheel to front fork, attach headlight, and pedals. Loosen the wheel’s two nuts, fasten wheel to the front fork (with disc brake on the same side as the rear one), attach the safety locks, and then re-tighten the bolts. The arrows on the disc brake should be pointing in the same direction as the ones found on the side of the tire. Attach the headlight to the front fork.

Front Wheel, Nut Cover, Headlight

Front Wheel, Nut Cover, Headlight

Note the “L” and “R” label on each pedal and use a wrench to securely mount them in the appropriate direction to the crank arms. Left pedal tightens counterclockwise, right one secures clockwise.

You could replace the factory ones with Kootu Folding Pedals to help save space while in storage. Below is an example from my Googo SY26 review:

Attach pedals to crank arms

Attach pedals to crank arms

Check rear derailleur protector. You may have to pull the protector a bit until it hovers nicely over the derailleur. It should be cleared enough for the derailleur to freely switch gears. Our Jaison‘s drivetrain needed to have the chain placed back onto the front chainring. Do so by pushing the rear derailleur down and towards the front to give the chain some slack.

Place chain onto front chainring as needed

Place chain onto front chainring as needed

Install seat post, then inflate tires. Tires are sized 20 x 3.0 (20″), use Schrader valves, and should be inflated to no more than 35 psi. I added spoke reflectors for increased visibility. Esuik Dual-Cylinder Foot Pump was used to inflate the tires.

Attach the tail light as needed, adjust the seat post to the proper height (legs should be slightly bent at a 160 degree angle while seated and with foot on pedal at its lowest position), and do not lift the seat post beyond its maximum height line. Finally, fine tune disc brakes, brake handles, and gear shifters as needed.

Battery Tail Light (Warning: alternating Red/Blue lights may be illegal due to police association)

Battery Tail Light (Warning: alternating Red/Blue lights may be illegal due to police association)

Programming

To enter programming mode: Press the “M” button twice until “P1” shows on the LCD. Cycle through the options with the “M” button, change values with “+” or “-“, and save the changed setting(s) by leaving the screen for a few seconds or pressing “M”. Press “M” twice to exit programming.

Program Options

PROGRAM AT YOUR OWN RISK! Improper use may void warranty and/or cause bike to fail or be damaged.

Options marked with * were locked and could not be changed on my Jasion.

Standard Settings

  • P1: Backlight brightness. 1-5 (brightest). Default: 4
  • P2: Idle time to enter sleep mode. 1-9 minutes or “Off”. Default: 5
  • P3: Unit display. 0 = kilometers (km/h), 1 = miles (mph). Default: 1
  • P4: Transmission. 0 = Manual, 1 = Automatic. Default: 0
    • Automatic transmission dynamically switches PAS gear based on current speed
  • P5: Enter Advanced Settings. Type in code. Default: 1801

Advanced Settings

  • A1: Do not modify. Battery Voltage. 24, 36, 48, UBE.  Default: 48
    • “UBE” = User-defined voltage set with a computer program
  • A2: Number of PAS gears. 3, 5, 9, 6.  Default: 5
  • A3*: Maximum speed. 10-50 km/h. 50 or higher = No limit. Default: 32 (19.88 mph)
    • Note: Had no effect on my bike. It still went 38.8 km/h (24.1 mph) even when set to 10 km/h (6.2 mph). Jasion technical support confirmed that this setting is locked and cannot be changed from the display
    • Be sure to convert correctly as the unit is in km/h, not mph
    • Changing limit to 50 or even 100 will allow the motor to run at its full capacity
      • Can result in overheating and cut motor’s life short. Going over 20 mph may be illegal in your State or country

Warning: Configuring maximum speed to go past 20 mph can overheat the motor and cut its life short. Going that fast may also be illegal in your State or country.

  • A4: Do not modify. Current limit. 5-30A.  Default: 18
    • Ensure this is set to what the controller and hub motor can handle
  • A5: Do not modify. Wheel diameter (inches) in 2 increments. Must match wheel size. 16-26, “700C“, 28. Default: 22
  • A6: Do not modify. Number of magnets for measuring speed. 01-50.  Default: 01
  • A7: Do not modify. Throttle. 01-24.  Default: 03
  • A8: Do not modify. Power Assist (PAS) Sensor. 0-3.  Default: 0
  • A9: Do not modify. Sensor direction. 0 = Normal/Forward, 1 = Reverse.  Default: 0

Error Codes

If an error occurs, a code will be shown on the display.

  • 21: Abnormal Current. Check if all plugs are connected properly or have been damaged
  • 22: Throttle Fault. Often the result of activating the handlebar throttle while turning the bike on
  • 23: Motor Phase Problem. Often a result of a connection error between the plug and motor. Check if all plugs are connected properly or have been damaged
  • 24: Motor Hall Signal. Often a result of a connection error between the controller and motor. Check if all plugs are connected properly or have been damaged
  • 25: Brake Abnormality. Often a result of holding down the brake handle while turning the bike on
  • 30: Communication Failure. Often a result of a connection error between the display and controller. Check if all plugs are connected properly or have been damaged

Motor Bike Laws

I first learned about laws governing motorized scooters when reviewing the Joyor X5S, and unfortunately, they were (and still are) not straight-forward. There had been a number of accidents involving scooters hitting pedestrians or riders hurting themselves. I get it. Laws are there to protect people from each other and themselves, especially from irresponsible individuals.

Electric bikes can result in severe injuries or death with their high speeds.

Surprisingly, the laws governing electric BIKES are much more lax. They are very similar to non-motorized bikes, in fact! There are different classes of eBikes. This Jasion falls under the lower-speed Class 2 with a maximum of up to 20 mph, and as such, can be used on Class 1 bike paths in California. All 3 classes can ride on the protected, one-way Class 2 bike lanes found on streets and highways. Be sure to check with your local regulations. Some States categorize eBikes as mopeds or motor vehicles.

  • Class 1: PAS-only with no throttle. Max assisted speed: 20 mph
  • Class 2: PAS and throttle. Max assisted speed: 20 mph
  • Class 3: PAS-only with no throttle. Max assisted speed: 28 mph

California Law

Disclaimer: I AM NOT A LAWYER. Please consult your local city, police department, and/or legal professional for advice.

The following is my interpretation of how I understand the law. It has been shortened to only point out parts that I found interesting or noteworthy.

Mountain biking with Cybertrack 100 /Metakoo

Mountain biking with Cybertrack 100 /Metakoo

  • Does NOT require riding with a Driver’s License or Instruction Permit (eScooters require them!)
  • No license plate required
  • Passengers are allowed as long as the bike was designed for it
  • Can ride on existing bike infrastructure
  • Speed limited to 20 mph
  • Follow most of the same laws as non-motorized bicycles
  • Helmet required for riders 17 years and younger
  • No minimum age limit

Accessories

Some accessories I recommend for this bike for added convenience and safety:

Final Thoughts

The search for an electric bike for my mom’s height of 5’1″ was a long one. It was incredibly difficult to find a foldable one for her height with at least 7 gear shifts and fat tires for better balance and control. Safety, ease of mount/dismount, and long battery life were also important as I did not want an elderly woman to get hurt or overexert on one of our long family rides. Jasion’s EB7 Foldable Electric Bicycle, despite my main frustration with the ignition’s location, has checked every criteria I sought for her. It is well-built, was smooth to ride on, and had quite the acceleration with its 500W of nominal power. I may look to replace the front wheel with a quick-release skewer to make it easier to fix a flat tire out on the field and also add a cargo rack.

Jasion EB7 Foldable eBike

Jasion EB7 Foldable eBike

Overall, the Jasion handled hills well (much better than my Googo or dad’s Metakoo, in fact), and the larger battery capacity should provide plenty of power to help mom not cramp up her thighs on the longer trips.

My family and I had very much enjoyed exploring town together instead of idling around in the car. It is both a healthy activity and a great way to bond with one another while building up the children’s confidence and endurance. I have not found myself going back to a non-motorized bicycle for daily rides, although I would still only take out my trusty Santa Cruz for more advanced mountain thrills.

Having the option to dynamically turn on or off electronic pedal assist is GREAT — that way, you can go manual, motor assisted, or all motorized.

Where To Buy

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